Wednesday’s Flower Gallery

This bloom has such a sweet… Demeanor, yet it’s a little dickens (as my mom would say), as it never ends up in the same place in my garden each year. Its seeds blow in the wind and land where they see fit. It’s definitely not concerned with my well laid out plan for my garden. Instead, it keeps me on my toes and helps me to learn that not everything has an order. Sometimes it’s about lett...

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It’s not a Tiger Lily…? “No,” replied Anna, who writes every Wednesday’s Flower facts. She nicely informed me that I was confusing it with the Asiatic Orange Lily that is called a Tiger Lily. I must admit that I have been confused for some time and appreciate being educated of its real name. As always Anna, thanks for teaching us about flowers, as you do it so well! Find this flower an...

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Ouch!... I cried out, as I was stabbed in the temple by a very pointed and sharp-ended leaf that protected this delicate, soft flower. After getting over the surprise of it, I could only laugh at myself, as I should have been more aware of my “hostile” surroundings. It did then beg the question, “how does such a harsh environment create such a gentle and sweet flower?” Sometimes an exteri...

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If an artist were to paint this flower… I could imagine her starting with a subtle green backdrop. Then with a wide paintbrush she creates its three softly-cupped petals. Working inwardly using a very thin, delicate brush she carefully creates the fluffy stamen center. Then she picks up a slightly wider brush, adding the contrasting yellow of the anther. It sounds so simple in words, but I know...

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A goblet… Is a large footed cup that is often shared. It’s something I associate with King Arthur’s table and with receiving communion at church. No matter what you associate it with, let’s all share in the beauty of this unique flower that looks like a goblet: a chalice. Find this flower and others in our floral print store.

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There is a lot I don’t know about flowers… While on vacation in Dublin, Ireland, this bloom I photographed at the National Botanical Garden is, ironically, native to the United States. I guess I’m drawn to what catches my eye the most, regardless of what is native to the area. I hope it catches your eye, too. Find this flower and others in our floral print store.

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This flower's tale is one of unrequited love... For a prince, with a princess who does not return his affection. But the story I would tell is one of resilience of the heart. It starts in the early spring from under the cold winter floor. It wiggles its way through the soil to return the sun's warm greeting. Its arched stems are delicate, yet can bear the test of the strongest of winds and hars...

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Gently cup your hands together… Cup them as if you’re holding something fragile, so you can see the inside of your hands. Now imagine your four fingers on your right hand form a soft, silky, orange petal. Next, your palm and thumb create the second petal. Repeat on your left hand and imagine them floating in the wind. Now your hands create the essence of this bloom: four delicate orange petal...

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To twirl… Whirl, turn around, revolve, and spin on one foot with arms reaching aloft: a pirouette. Who knew a flower could do a perfect one?! And maybe, just for the fun of it, I’ll try one myself! Find this flower and others in our floral print store.

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Is it a pansy or an imposter..? Upon closer inspection, I realized it was not a pansy once I noticed the foliage, which told me it was an orchid. It’s such a surprise, that in this vast world of flowers, there would be one that would mimic a pansy, or vice versa. This bloom does have some of its own intriguing nuances like the tie-dye center. It reminds me of the Rorschach ink blot tests. Find...

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